Unusual Injury

This is a bona fide post about running. This is the justification for me telling people I have a running blog as opposed to a part of t’internet where my over active brain vents.
I’ve had a pretty good (by my standards) few weeks of running. The astral eclipse of motivation, lack of injury, available time and good weather have meant that I’ve been putting in 10 mile hill runs every other day for the last 3 or 4 weeks. This is the sort of foundation that great things are built on – if you have stuff to build with – stuff that I seem to have neglected to collect from the supply store of running – stuff like ability, consistency, other words that end in y.
All was going well until I picked up the weirdest injury you could imagine. Like most runners I am in a constant state of repair/injury/anxiety about the condition of my body from the waist down (excluding the non-running bits – I’d need to be an extreme porn star for the same emotional condition to exist). This injury is an upper body injury. Some sort of cracked or bruised rib or intercostal muscles.
I was out last Sunday for a 10 miler in between the heavy summer showers that made up the death throes of some Atlantic hurricane. The sort of 5 minute showers that were short enough not to need a rain jacket but intense enough to almost hypnotise you as you watched (from shelter) the precipitation. This was mile 1 of a 10 miler so getting fussy about the rain was pointless given the amount of sweat I’d have on me by the end of the run.
That said, I have one of those Garmin watches that doesn’t work very well in the rain. How they got this sort of product past any sort of product development or focus group is beyond me. Can you imagine the pitch that was made for this sort of things (think Bob Newhart tobacco sketch): OK, so this is a GPS watch for running and cycling? yea. Right, and sweat and rain make it malfunction? yea…………OK, seems fine, when can we start shipping?
There is a little “press all the buttons at once” trick you can do with these watches that allows you to remove this malfunction in the rain function they have built into them. I was running along – on the Blackrock railway line – deserted in the rain- staring and fiddling with my watch when all of a sudden….boom.
I ran straight into the only other person stupid enough to be out in the rain. She (a lady runner) saw me at the very last second and put up her hands to stop a serious collision (for her). I never saw her so I had a serious collision.
I was totally unprepared for the impact so the area of impact couldn’t flex up for protection. The outer edge of the left pectoral and ribcage took the full brunt of the impact.
All of this took place in a split second in case you thought it was a slo-mo kung-fu movie sort of event.
Not wanting to let on that I was so hurt I might need my mammy I ran on (as did she) but I pulled up about 200m later to survey the damage. Everything was working but it felt very sore. I did what all sensible runners would do at that point: I kept going with the run hoping that i could run the injury off. To be fair, the endorphins meant that the injury didn’t seem so bad (at the time).
Now, one run and three days later I can’t raise my left arm over my shoulder, can’t sleep properly and am generally sore.
I have toyed with going to the Doctor for it but that seems like a waste of €50. As it’s still sore I suspect it’s some sort of rib injury or a bruise where a key muscle inserts into the bone. Doctors normally prescribe pain killers and rest for this sort of thing. You don’t get a big plaster cast or no homework so what’s the point? You’d be €50 poorer and just look dumb.
No, the only solution to this sort of injury is to ignore it and it will blend into the other injuries that are simmering away under the delicate veneer of good health I present to the outside world.
As my mother always says to me: Always look where you’re going

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